Tag Archives: female prisoners

Prisoner Caption – Vika Part 1

Television presenter Vika had always been fiercely competitive, so when there seemed to be competition; developing to host a new show that was tipped to be a hit, she did whatever it took to crush it!

She subjected her main opponent to a campaign which involved coordinated death threats and vandalism against her property, causing her to remove herself from the public eye and handing the job to Vika (@vika_model). Until, that is, the trail of the investigation reacher her.

Charged with multiple offenses, she lost her jobs and eventually agreed to a plea bargain, under the terms of which she would report to prison withing 30 days to start her 4 – 6-year sentence.

She used that time to arrange a controversial photo shoot in which she was shown in various prison restraints, an attempt to make light of what had happened and her upcoming punishment and set the stage for a comeback when she is released.

It was widely condemned but made sure that she remained talked about, something that will be vital as she is locked away and removed from the public eye for the years to come.

Story – Audited – Young women sentenced, handcuffed and jailed

Nobody wants to be audited, but the new crime audits make being audited by the IRS look like a walk in the park. Under the terms of the Criminal Accountability Act, citizens are randomly chosen, and every aspect of their life and past is thoroughly investigated. Large amounts of data are available to investigators at the Criminal Audit Division of the FBI. Bank records, security camera footage from locations and times the audited person was known to be at, and cellphone records and emails are accessible.

The letter informing the recipient that they have been audited is hand delivered. From that point they have two months to fill out and return what is called a ‘declaration’ and a ‘bid’. The declaration is a list of all criminal offenses that the audited person thinks that they have committed, together with as many details as they can remember. The bid is the suggestion that the audited person makes about what their punishment should be. At this point, they have no idea what the CAD knows about what they have done. They are told that they must record every single crime they can recall, but in practice this involves a guessing game about what the investigators will be likely to find. The more that the audited person reveals about their criminal offenses (especially ones unknown to the auditors) the more likely the CAD are likely to be lenient. One of the ways in which they can be lenient is to accept a low bid.

Obviously, the complexity of all this makes hiring an attorney necessary. At the moment, the system is relatively new, so even the most experienced attorneys are still trying to find the best ways to help their clients. What crimes should they declare? What should their bids be like? They want to try and secure the lowest possible sentence but bid too low and the CAD will seek a total sentence that tends towards the upper end of the sentencing rules. Ultimately a judge decides, but they have not yet rejected an accepted bid or deviated much from the recommended sentence requested by CAD after a rejected bid. If the CAD attribute any additional crimes to the defendant beyond what they have declared, they can challenge them, but it invalidates their bid which may otherwise be accepted by the CAD with a recommendation for an additional element based on the added offenses. Rejection of additional crimes usually results in a criminal trial on those charges. If the defendant has already admitted to enough criminal offenses to warrant it, CAD usually requests that they be held on remand ahead of the trial, and this is usually granted and does not count towards any final sentence. So the incentive is there to be as thorough and accepting as possible.

Continue reading Story – Audited – Young women sentenced, handcuffed and jailed

Story – Judge Reynolds

He hadn’t been a completely popular choice for the American Prison Reform Association’s ‘Man of the Year’ award, but in the reception before the ceremony he won over some of the doubters. As Judge Anthony Reynolds worked the room, he knew who favored him and who didn’t. He was courteous and charming to those who were pleased he was there, but he made a real effort on those who weren’t so pleased.

He was being honored for setting up and leading the Prison Welfare Commission, an organization which had been credited for making prison safer for inmates, and campaigning for prisoners to be able to work and not stay in their cells all day. No-one at the award ceremony had a problem with the work of the Commission. They did believe that in spite of his work with the Commission, Judge Reynolds passed harsh sentences and therefore shouldn’t be given the award.

Continue reading Story – Judge Reynolds

Incarceration Experiment – A Reader Replies

We have received an email from a reader, Rick, and are grateful he has agreed to allow us to publish it (please refer to the previous article):

‘Someone showed me the reports on the Incarceration Experiment, thanks to your reporters for publicizing what is going on. My girlfriend was planning to drive through that state on the way to visit relatives, but as she seems to think the speed limit is advice not a law and sometimes uses her cellphone or puts on make-up while driving, I’ve suggested to her that she takes an alternative route. If she gets caught and jailed, I don’t plan on taking on more work to keep her out of the ‘default’ conditions!

Continue reading Incarceration Experiment – A Reader Replies